How Yoga Liberated My Lows, Through The Word “No”

How To Talk About Being Low

I’ve read a lot about the word “no” this year. It all started with Shonda Rhyme’s Year of Yes in which she actually wrote an entire chapter about saying no. She explained how learning to say no fortified her yeses. She says, “No is a complete sentence. I’ve heard that cliché over and over. So I decided to treat no in the same way I treat saying thank you. Say no and then don’t say anything else.”

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The Power Of The Pause (And Its Ability To Save Others From The Low Or High You)

Type 1 Diabetes

I used to think it was untouchable–beyond reach. Out of my control and me at its will. But, as time often allows, things soften. A small sliver of space has opened; the space to be me inside of a low or high blood sugar.

A conversation sparked last weekend at the JDRF One Walk in Oklahoma City, surrounding just this concept. I was catching up with an old friend (who also has T1D) and we discussed the subtle impacts that diabetes has on a day, by changing the course of a single moment; his feeling that blood sugars alter the flow of conversations. Citing specifically how it impacts his engagement in meetings, and I chimed in with how it sometimes impacts empathy with patients. And, in an accumulation of altered moments, he mentioned a friend of his had recently attributed a divorce to type 1. It’s there, the invisible (sometimes visible to others) blood sugar force. Continue reading

From T2D to T1D – The Re-Diagnosis Saga | Deirdre Murphy | Real Life Diabetes Podcast 30

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Amber loves to travel so she hit the road and ventured to Texas (one state away from our OKC home). What better way to meet fellow PWDs than traveling the southwestern countryside? Before heading out she contacted the American Diabetes Association to see if anyone in their part of town had a story to share. They totally hooked her up with Deirdre Murphy, a lovely woman who went from an original Type 2 diagnosis to eventually being re-diagnosed with Type 1. In the 30th show, Deirdre shares her 12+ year journey and reflects on living life with T2D… and now T1D, eventually coming to a place of relief at the type 1 prognosis (a rare event).

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The “AHA” Diabetes Moment Discovered On A Ropes Course

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In 2010, I joined 29 other folks to take part in Leadership Norman, a nine month training for business professionals. We met every other week and participated in a variety of sessions focused on community history, current community issues, leadership, and self-discovery. One of the sessions involved a physical, trust building experience of sorts – a ropes course. At this point, no one really knew I had Type 1 diabetes unless they happen to notice my tattoo, but this particular session brought attention to the disease.  Continue reading

How I Thrived as a T1D Peace Corps Volunteer (Part 3): Two Fists of Potatoes

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When I received my invitation to serve as a Peace Corps volunteer in Ukraine, it included a primer on life in Ukraine, with general information on history, geography, transportation, culture and a small section on food. It should come as no surprise to other PWD, but I have a sometimes wonderful and sometimes dangerous relationship with food. The information shared they’re heavy on meat and vegetables, with seasonal access to produce, and the majority of grocery shopping is done in open air bazaars and small shops. This was helpful, but didn’t minimize my anxiety when it came to carbohydrate counting or questions about glucose tab availability. Continue reading

The Reason I’m Sticking With Shots… For A Couple More Weeks

How To Exercise on Levemir or Lantus

Never fails. The thought enters, I love my pump, never had better control, and so thankful for it. Then, subtly the morning sugars are a little off.  Then, I find myself chasing blood sugars. Then, I start doubting the pump and begin thinking about insulin resistance in pump site locations. Then, I switch back to the ol’ long-term/short-term game. Every couple of years this sneaky process plays its way out. Continue reading

The Catching-Up Show: Who Are You Again? | Amber and Ryan | Real Life Diabetes Podcast 29

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Yes, behind Amber’s face is Kelly McKeever (in RLD 28) cropped out. We move on to the next episode quickly.

One can only talk oneself for so long, right? Wrong, Amber and Ryan dedicated an entire show to each other (we thought they talked plenty already about themselves in ordinary episodes). In conversation a week prior, they realized much of life had passed by since they had a good sit-down chat. It was time t0 “catch-up” on life, diabetes, and pick-up strategies (Ryan heads to the trail and Amber heads to Whole Foods). Amber elaborates on a DDG post about her recent extraordinarily ignorant endocrinologist visit, while Ryan updates on his new, old-school approach to diabetes management.

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Back To The Drawing Board With A New Endocrinologist

Doctor's Office

In my opinion, having a good rapport with your endocrinologist is vital to living a fulfilled and happy life with diabetes. Over the past 33 years, I’ve had three, maybe four folks who guided me on my T1D journey. As a creature of habit, change is hard so when I was contacted by my current endocrinologist’s office and informed he was ill and no longer seeing patients, I braced myself. I was sad he was not doing well and a bit trepidatious about having to cultivate a new relationship from scratch.  Continue reading

About As Near Normal As Possible (Riding A Diet Revolution To A 5.1 A1C)

Diabetes Diet Philosophy - Type 1

Imagine putting your child with type one diabetes (T1D) to bed with less fear of a dangerously low blood sugar. If you have T1D, imagine doing a triathlon or a belly dancing class your friend keeps bugging you about with confidence your blood sugar will remain stable along with your energy levels. The process I used to achieve near normal blood sugar took some time, commitment, experimentation, and sacrifice. All people with T1D have unique physiologies and my experience may not extrapolate to anyone else. However, the process I used is inexpensive and has no side effects, but the benefits could be priceless. Continue reading