Why Endocrinologists Ask To See Our Feet…

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It’s almost insulting, right? There you are, an adult, being asked to take your shoes off for a foot exam. This was always puzzling as a kid, leaving me thinking, “Yo Doc, if I had a foot ulcer or something, don’t you think I’d know?” But nevertheless, I always take my shoes off–hoping I have on matching socks and my feet are tolerable in scent–and let the endo do his or her cursory 3 second glance, eventually sliding my socks back on to a good report.
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How I Thrived as a T1D Peace Corps Volunteer (Pt. 4): For a Good Time, Call a Pharmacist

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I spent an unnatural amount of time trying to start this post – wondering how I’d weave the tale of diabetes supplies lost and broken during my two-year stint in Ukraine. Looking back on a few instances, I could have done a number of things better or differently to improve an outcome or expedite solutions. However, I didn’t. In a previous post, I mentioned my “diabetes doesn’t control my life” mantra. I’m proud of my how I control my T1D, but I’m sure I’ve managed to terrify several medical professionals with my “put some duct tape on it” approach to T1D troubleshooting. I can’t help it! Continue reading

How To Live Every Day With Adventure | Mark Carter, T1D | Real Life Diabetes Podcast 32

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You never know when you’ll run into someone who shares a similar life philosophy, but after a chance meeting in college, Mark Carter resurfaces on Okie soil. He’s real and doesn’t hold back about his love of Equal and Chik-Fil-A. In this episode, our longest one yet, he shares his journey of being an ambassador for people with diabetes who don’t have a voice. If you’re brave enough to listen to the whole thing, we hope you’ll leave with the thought – is diabetes a blessing or a curse? Continue reading

Tiptoeing Onto The Tightrope -The Balancing Act of Changing Insulin

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I believe I’ve made it quite clear that I’m creature of habit, especially when it comes to my diabetes regimen. If I had to be brutally honest, I can’t fathom changing things because my numbers are good. At the same time, I look at my T1D peers and feel as if I’ve been left behind. What’s holding me back? This thought process led me to a recent decision to shake things up.  Continue reading

The Million Dollar Election Question: Will I Be Paying A Million Dollars To Stay Alive?

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I have to speak up after the second presidential debate on the issue of the healthcare reform.
I feel the need to stand against someone like Trump. I need to talk about healthcare reform and the miracle that has given me the gift of life, because of the policy put into place by President Obama, Secretary Clinton, and all of the government that made it possible for me to have health insurance and healthcare in this country.

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A Non-Techie Father Finds NightScout | Clayton McCook on T1D Parenting Empowerment | Real Life Diabetes Podcast 31

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At the JDRF Summit last January in Oklahoma City, we struck up a conversation with the father of Lily, an adorable, youngster who lives with T1D. She had on this awesome-looking watch with her blood sugar. So did her Dad. We had to explore further. In this episode, Clayton shares his family’s philosophies on parenting and empowering the T1D life. While not a “techie guy”, he managed to discover and use Night Scout… while continuing to develop an artificial pancreas in his basement. There’s some wisdom in this one folks.
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Post-Transplant Thought: Who Am I Without Diabetes?

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So I don’t have diabetes anymore, I think. Or at least for now I am on a diabetes vacation. After twenty two years living with type one diabetes, I am having somewhat of an identity crisis.

As people with diabetes, we are thinking constantly about our health. We are so in tune with how we feel throughout the day. From symptoms of high and low blood sugars, to fatigue, to nausea, to blurry vision, to cloudy thinking, we feel it all on most days of our lives. Continue reading