Knocking It Out In One Shot – Happy World Diabetes Day

World Diabetes Day

We’re SO excited to participate in our first World Diabetes Day. With so much DOC love, wonderful causes and organizations, we created a short video to show our support. We hope you enjoy this impromptu video – Diabetes Daily Grind style. Cheers to the highs and lows everyone.

D-Dating, Honesty Is The Best Policy And Here’s Why

dating

Whether you view dating as an enticing, fun experience or there’s nothing more you’d rather run and hide from, diabetes may be one extra thing to consider (and it’s important that you do)! As a young adult who has lived with type one her whole life, albeit minus 4 years, there are many questions I ask myself when it comes to dating:

  • When/How do I tell them about my diabetes?
  • What if there’s an emergency and they don’t know I have diabetes?

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How To Live Every Day With Adventure | Mark Carter, T1D | Real Life Diabetes Podcast 32

how-to-live-type-1-diabetes-with-adventure-real-life-diabetes-podcast

You never know when you’ll run into someone who shares a similar life philosophy, but after a chance meeting in college, Mark Carter resurfaces on Okie soil. He’s real and doesn’t hold back about his love of Equal and Chik-Fil-A. In this episode, our longest one yet, he shares his journey of being an ambassador for people with diabetes who don’t have a voice. If you’re brave enough to listen to the whole thing, we hope you’ll leave with the thought – is diabetes a blessing or a curse? Continue reading

How Yoga Liberated My Lows, Through The Word “No”

How To Talk About Being Low

I’ve read a lot about the word “no” this year. It all started with Shonda Rhyme’s Year of Yes in which she actually wrote an entire chapter about saying no. She explained how learning to say no fortified her yeses. She says, “No is a complete sentence. I’ve heard that cliché over and over. So I decided to treat no in the same way I treat saying thank you. Say no and then don’t say anything else.”

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From T2D to T1D – The Re-Diagnosis Saga | Deirdre Murphy | Real Life Diabetes Podcast 30

real-life-diabetes-podcast-30
Amber loves to travel so she hit the road and ventured to Texas (one state away from our OKC home). What better way to meet fellow PWDs than traveling the southwestern countryside? Before heading out she contacted the American Diabetes Association to see if anyone in their part of town had a story to share. They totally hooked her up with Deirdre Murphy, a lovely woman who went from an original Type 2 diagnosis to eventually being re-diagnosed with Type 1. In the 30th show, Deirdre shares her 12+ year journey and reflects on living life with T2D… and now T1D, eventually coming to a place of relief at the type 1 prognosis (a rare event).

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How I Thrived as a T1D Peace Corps Volunteer (Part 3): Two Fists of Potatoes

making-varenyks_ukraine

When I received my invitation to serve as a Peace Corps volunteer in Ukraine, it included a primer on life in Ukraine, with general information on history, geography, transportation, culture and a small section on food. It should come as no surprise to other PWD, but I have a sometimes wonderful and sometimes dangerous relationship with food. The information shared they’re heavy on meat and vegetables, with seasonal access to produce, and the majority of grocery shopping is done in open air bazaars and small shops. This was helpful, but didn’t minimize my anxiety when it came to carbohydrate counting or questions about glucose tab availability. Continue reading

About As Near Normal As Possible (Riding A Diet Revolution To A 5.1 A1C)

Diabetes Diet Philosophy - Type 1

Imagine putting your child with type one diabetes (T1D) to bed with less fear of a dangerously low blood sugar. If you have T1D, imagine doing a triathlon or a belly dancing class your friend keeps bugging you about with confidence your blood sugar will remain stable along with your energy levels. The process I used to achieve near normal blood sugar took some time, commitment, experimentation, and sacrifice. All people with T1D have unique physiologies and my experience may not extrapolate to anyone else. However, the process I used is inexpensive and has no side effects, but the benefits could be priceless. Continue reading

Finding Your Artwork in Your Blood Work

Paint By Numbers

Remember doing those paint-by-number sheets when you were a kid? It seemed magical when a confusing canvas of intersecting lines and random numbers transformed into a circus elephant or something equally amazing. I remember the joy I experienced when I produced my first masterpiece and the new found love I had for being an “artist.” Continue reading

The Proof’s In The Sugar-Free Pudding: Diabetes Camp Changes Lives | Kelly McKeever, RN and CDE (Officially!) | Real Life Diabetes Podcast 28

Photo Courtesy Of The Harold Hamm Diabetes Center

Photo Courtesy Of The Harold Hamm Diabetes Center

Amber and Ryan sweet talked past guest, fellow T1D, and long-time diabetes camp enthusiast, Kelly McKeever, into joining a summer edition of the show. Kelly’s had 13+ years at camp and shares what keeps him coming back, now in a medical personnel role. In this episode they catch up on life with diabetes, cutting edge developments in diabetes tech, the camp life experience, what we learned about ourselves, and the value of having “a diabetes community in person”. Continue reading

Pt. 2, Thriving As A T1D Peace Corps Volunteer: How to Say ‘Insulin Pump’ in Ukrainian

Moncia's Host Family

I arrived in Ukraine with my life packed into two suitcases (one of which was half filled with medical supplies). My first stop as a Peace Corps trainee was an old sanitarium just outside the capital city of Kyiv. There, my group of volunteers had a few buffer days in which Peace Corps became real: we learned which language we would study, where our 10-week language and job training would take place, which other volunteers would be in our 4-5 person training ‘cluster’, and we filled out a lot of paperwork. This is also where I had to decide how and to whom I would tell about my diabetes. Continue reading