One Parallel Between Golf and Diabetes We Must Take To Heart

Golf and Diabetes Parallel - Diabetes Management

Golf is a game of life. Diabetes is a game of life. For those who have held a club, struck the small white ball off the tee, and tallied shots, you will understand today’s analogy, just in time for the PGA Championship at Whistling Straits. For those who have not, you too will appreciate the talk. Golf is merely the vehicle for a mightier conversation—diabetes happens to share the same fairways and greens.

Suffering seems to be an inherent aspect of both golf and diabetes. Again, for those who have swung an iron, seen the ball skyrocket off the clubface into knee high thicket out of bounds, after having just driven the ball dead down the middle of the fairway, this can be a tortuous place to reside within the mind. In my experience, this feels pretty much the same as waking up with a blood sugar of 105, eating your standard breakfast, taking your experience-driven insulin dosage, and two hours later, discovering blood sugar of 263. Both results do not meet expectations—expectations we feel we own. Continue reading

The 80/20 Rule: Playing By My Own Rules

percentage

The 80/20 rule usually means that 20 percent of the causes create 80 percent of the results. As a TID for 29 years, I think of it a little differently. I like to believe if I follow the rules 80 percent of the time, I can “bend” them for 20 percent.

So, what does that really mean for a person with T1D?

It means that I’m not so hard on myself when I slip-up.
It means that I’m not pressured by the illusive perfection in diabetes management. Continue reading

Take That Diabetes – Today I Win

DDG Flipping the Bird

I’m stoked to share my recent visit to the endocrinologist.  In earlier years this dreaded trip brought on a week or so of anxiety…  Would he know I lied about my blood sugar?  Could he tell I drank a wine cooler a few weeks ago?  Will they have to take blood?  He is the window into my diabetic life and I was terrified as to what he could reveal.  I no longer stress about this biannual visit, in fact, I kind of enjoy it.  I work hard every single day to feel good and my numbers hopefully reflect my actions.

The visit starts with a super sweet nurse who allows me to prick my own finger.  YAY ME!  Having someone else prick my finger seems to be WAY more painful (control issues?).   Continue reading

Tuesday Topic: Is Your “Real Range” Putting You At Risk For Complications?

Diabetes Complications

So, this is touchy. Just thinking about an A1C test can make your pulse go up. It defines us. Should it? There’s an argument for both sides–but at the end of the day–yeah, it goes a long way towards determining future complications. In speaking with my CDE (certified diabetes educator), we broached the likelihood of complications topic. This was my question, “What’s the A1C number where complications (foot, kidneys, eyes) are unlikely?” She responded by saying 7 or below.

Alright, according to this calculator, we need to be averaging a sugar of 153 to make it happen.

It seems straight-forward. Keep your sugar below 153 and life is good. Here’s where it gets dicey.

We all have a number–a number where we feel our best. Energized. Competent. Compassionate. That’s the real number. That’s the number that stands alone outside of our targets. This number has been sculpted from years of diabetes education, lessons learned, scars, and regret. For me, I feel like I can save the world at 140. Below it, I wouldn’t say that I feel low, but I would say that feel anxiety. Above it, I feel alright until about 180. Continue reading

Tuesday Topic: 29 Things Only a Person with Diabetes Would Understand

chic getting a shotWe recently came across an article by Healthline.com that had us both laughing and crying.  CLICK HERE to read the article.  It is so nice to know that others get it and can join us in laughing about the daily struggles of living with this disease.

We are particularly fond of the following:

  • #2 – You have an entire drawer, dresser or , or closet devoted to diabetes supplies.
  • #7 – Your fingers appear to speall something in braille.
  • #10 – You should test your blood sugar six times a day, but insurance only approved you for one strip a week.
  • #17 – You find used test strips in your refrigerator, but don’t know how they got there.
  • #29 – To lick or to wipe?  That is the question.  (I never knew that licking was an option until I met Ryan – who knew?).

The Grind has created a few additions to this list.  Hope you enjoy. Continue reading

Fellow Grinder – Meet a T2D Who Flipped the Switch

The DDG wants to share the stories of fellow diabetic warriors.  Meet John B., a Type 2 diabetic who used the diagnosis as a catalyst to transform his life.

DDG: Dude, what are you all about?
JB: I have type 2 diabetes. It is a disease of choice and I choose not to live with the symptoms anymore. I will work hard, play outside in God’s playground, be present and I choose life! That is what I’m about.

DDG: Tell us about your diagnosis day.    

JB: I was diagnosed November 30, 2011.  I hadn’t been feeling well and I suspected diabetes, so I went in for some blood work.  Dr. Ratliff called to tell me that my A1c was critically high and my blood sugar was 434.  I have Type 2 diabetes and had apparently had it for quite some time. That was the most important date in my life because it allowed me to move forward with purpose, and live my life by my rules. I just had to learn what those rules would be.  I decided the minute I hung-up the phone that I was going to live, not only live, I was going to thrive!   As Andy Dufresne (Shawshank Redemption) said,  “Get busy living, or get busy dying”. Continue reading