The Endurance Exercise Principles (i.e. The Guide To Avoid Lows At All Costs)

How To Avoid Going Low During Exercise

Exercise is quite the paradox in diabetes management. On one hand, it provides long-term stabilization and a natural lowering of glucose. On the other, it supplies the most significant swings in glucose levels possible. As outlined in previous posts, depending on the kind of exercise being performed (aerobic vs anaerobic), one can expect different glucose results. Today, I’m exploring a couple of principles that I’ve noticed over the past two years of marathon training and duathlon events. I’m no professional. Just a guy who likes to get his heart rate up every once in awhile, while avoiding the catastrophic low. Continue reading

Blueberry, Whole-Grain Pancakes – Workout Recovery Perfection

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All runners know the moment intimately. You’re halfway through a long morning run. You know that the finish line is crossable. You’ve been chewing on dates, Hammer gels, and all other forms of caffeine carbohydrate concoctions for the last hour or so. You can actually hear your stomach growling. All the pain or fatigue starts to disappear, being replaced by this insatiable hunger. All you can think about is EATING. Continue reading

Running a Marathon with Type 1 Diabetes

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June marked the 2nd marathon I’ve run in two months. I don’t feel special, nor am I dawning a 26.2 sticker on my car. I run because I find that running is good for the soul. Nevertheless, I hope through sharing a few training tips and race tricks I can inspire more people with diabetes to lace ‘em up.

Training Breakdown

Here’s how the average training week looked over the previous three months:

M – Off
T – 6 miles (Some kind of interval training)
W – Cross Training (Yoga, cycling, etc.)
Th – 6 miles (Ran at marathon race pace)
F – Off
Sa – 4 miles (10K pace)
Su – 10 to 20 miles (15-30 seconds slower than marathon pace)
Continue reading