11.3.15

I’ve Come To Terms With Being A T1D Walking Science Project

Science Project 4

Every day hosts a new set of challenges for a PWD. You have to think on your feet while planning well in advance if there’s a shot in hell of maintaining your BG goal. I’ld like to believe my BG report card would have an A+ in this every evolving science project we call diabetes. Any rational T1D knows that even though we strive for an A+, some days are just a C or even worse, an F. The science project continues…

Daily Formula: Current BG + Carb Ratio + Correction Factor Hormones + Stress + Anxiety + Exercise + Allergies + Sickness + Booze + Altitude Whatever else is going on in life = Hoping For The Best!

About a week ago I kept bottoming out around 2am. After day three, my mind shifted to a checklist of causes.

  • Was I on the last four days of my period?
    • No
  • Have I cut back on carbs?
    • Not really.
  • Was I exercising more that usual.
    • I wish.

So none of this makes sense. What’s next? I decide to take action while staying optimistic there won’t be any unforeseen explosions (AKA serious highs or lows).

Plan Of Action:

  • I cut back my Lantus dosage.
    • Maybe I have too much Lantus floating around. Cutting back slowly will help me determine if this is the culprit.
  • My dinner will be heavy on veggies – little to no carbs.
    • Couldn’t hurt – maybe I’ll shed a few pounds.
  • I’ll increase my exercise routine and incorporate non cardio practices.
    • Not sure what the theory is here, but it’s something new and I need to work on muscle tone.
  • I’ll be diligent with my meditation.
    • This will override the stress component.

After a week I noticed a slight shift in the number of low BGs at night. I’m still tweaking the formula and will continue adjusting as I determine what is and isn’t making a difference. If my numbers were reflected on a real report card, my average would be B-, but I would get an A++++++++++++ for effort. I’ll take it.

The DDG has harped time and time again that PWD are similar, but not the same. It’s my responsibility to adjust my lifestyle and keep my physicians in the loop. I’ll document my discoveries on our Twitter account, #walkingscienceproject. Feel free to chime in – maybe I’ll learn something new.

Amber Clour was born and raised in Norman, Oklahoma. 21 days after her eighth birthday, she was rushed to Children’s Hospital where she spent two weeks learning how to live life with Type 1 diabetes. She has embraced the thought of being a #walkingscienceproject and hopes to score an A+ for her efforts to maintain a stable BG while living life to the fullest - whatever that means.

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