Podcast 98: Research Is Me Search | Dr. Allyson Hughes

Dr. Allyson Hughes is a self-proclaimed animal lover, methodology geek and research scientist who collaborates with various industries to develop research projects from beginning to end, and advocates for health policy with the data she collects. Having been diagnosed with T1D herself, she knows all too well the struggles we face. This is what prompted her career path as a health psychologist dedicated to improving the lives of people living with diabetes.

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Podcast 15: Asking The Questions We’ve Always Wanted To Ask To People Who Actually Know The Answers | LIVE from the Connect+Cure Gala

Real Life Diabetes Podcast - Amber Clour and Ryan Fightmaster

In the midst of a VIP cocktail hour LIVE from the Connect+Cure Gala in Oklahoma City, leaders on the diabetes research and treatment frontier were kind enough to converse with us. We didn’t focus on run of the mill research questions. We got to the heart of their individual diabetes motivations. We covered the importance of a physician’s own A1C, the equal importance of cowboy boots, favorite Toby Keith (he played a full concert that night) songs, and why both Amber and Ryan haven’t been dropped as patients for non-compliance… yet. As the night’s feature ceremony, the Hamm Prize–$250,000 for research advances toward a cure–was awarded to Dr. Ronald Kahn, and he joined us to share his enlightening perspectives (that’s not hyperbole, it’s truth).

After we wrapped up our interviews, we were honored to join 900+ people who support the Harold Hamm Oklahoma Diabetes Center’s (HHODC) future and groundbreaking strides toward eradicating diabetes. As Oklahomans, where 1 out of every 3 people is affected by diabetes, it was a meaningful night filled with promise. We are so grateful for the opportunity provided by the Harold Hamm Diabetes Center and appreciative of our guests to supply insights for all of us with diabetes. Thank you everyone!  Continue reading

NO More Doom & Gloom

Trouble Ahead Sign

In my nightly reading, I’m often overwhelmed by the abundance of all things “doom & gloom” on the diabetes front.  The overall message seems to be – you’re going to die a lot sooner than the average person and here is a long list of complications to look forward to.   BOO.

Diabetes Statistic                                                                         Image taken from ahealthblog.com

I’m kicking off the week with a positive vibe by offering a sneak peak into my stockpile of recent reads.  I’ve officially become an article hoarder.  I hope you enjoy a few articles that made me laugh or offered a positive outlook on the disease.  Happy Reading. Continue reading

Your Guide To Sorting Through The “Latest Research”

Can We Trust a Study's Findings?

Odds are, right before you opened this article, you saw the findings of a recent research study blasted across your Facebook. Or Yahoo. Or the evening news. Or the radio. The scientific method has pushed our society forward on many accounts–producing the likes of penicillin and middle school science fairs–but it has also made choosing a healthy lifestyle incredibly complicated. Now the average joe can tell you how many grams of carbohydrates and protein are in a bagel. My grandpa could care less about all those numbers, but he knows that getting outside, walking a few miles a day, and eating apples makes him feel good.

After reading a recent article published widely across many diabetes platforms, I decided that we all needed a refresher course on how to approach research findings.

Feel free to use these tips next time you see a bit of research come your way:

1) Know your own bias.

We all come from somewhere. We all believe in things. The hardest part is dropping that when we try to learn about something else. I eat a vegan diet. I will probably have a different take on the results of the bacon and eggs diet than the person eating a bacon egg mcmuffin while reading the article. Continue reading